Tag Archives: Arcade Repair

Converting a Merit Radion Force Countertop From CRT to LCD (Without The Official Kit)

During a recent auction, I purchased a Merit Radion Force game system with a dying monitor. As the monitor was unusably dim at maximum brightness settings even under dim light, the cathode gun was likely on it’s way out; and a repair would cost many times more than what I paid for the machine itself. So rather than sink any money into it, I converted the whole machine to LCD using an old Samsung 15″ monitor with an external power brick supply that I hadn’t used in years.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

Auction pictures showing the dim monitor.

You’ve probably seen a counter top like this, although likely a newer model, in a bar or restaurant. Essentially, they’re designed to sit on a bar-top and play a collection of touch screen games. Each game costs anywhere from $0.25-$2.00 to play, which gives you around 2 minutes of play time. This breed of arcade machine is dying, with the largest manufacturer Merit having announced their shut down 2 months ago; likely thanks to smartphones which run similar games for free.

Anyhow, onto the repair. After giving the whole system a wipe-down and compressor dusting to clean it up, I disassembled the entire plastic shell assembly, leaving just the steel frame and electronics on the base. With the plastic out of the way, I disconnected the power cable to the monitor board, the touch screen’s serial cable, as well as the VGA cable (the whole machine is basically a computer running a custom version of Linux, and is built with all standard parts), peeled away the black duct tape holding the touch screen in place, and removed it from the monitor. The touch screen is made of glass, and is very fragile, so should you attempt this repair, be careful where you place it. After that, I unscrewed the monitor, and pulled it out of the cabinet by unlatching the board from the base. All of the parts were nicely designed to be “snap-in”, so removing it didn’t take long at all. Should you attempt this fix yourself, when removing or working near a CRT monitor, always be sure not to touch any electronics on the board, or attached to the tube (for example, the anode on top). As I’ve said before, the high voltage capacitors on the board are charged and are extremely dangerous if touched. Look up how to discharge monitor capacitors, and follow those instructions before continuing; and DO NOT attempt this fix if you aren’t comfortable working with them.

With the old monitor out of the way (I boxed it up and dropped it off at the local electronics recycling depot), I began preparing the LCD monitor for the switch. I disassembled the case, leaving only the monitor and control panel board, and mounted it where the old monitor was; using picture hanging wire fed through the old screw holes to keep it in place. With the monitor securely in place, I added about an inch of double-sided mounting tape (Dollarama sells it) to all four edges of the monitor, and covered the mounting tape in black duct tape to camouflage the tape with the plastic case. This mounting tape “shield” served to prevent the glass touch screen from scratching against the monitor’s metal edges, and raised it so that it was securely in place along the plastic front casing (which was slightly raised, since the old CRT extended further out of the cabinet.

How the monitor was secured (with duct tape!) and connected

How the monitor was secured (with duct tape!) and connected

With that done, I mounted the touch screen, securing it to the monitor with more black duct tape, and reconnected the monitor. Lucky for me, the LCD monitor’s external power brick fit nicely within the cabinet, and used the same plug socket, so that didn’t need to be changed at all. I taped it down to the base, so it wouldn’t slide around while moving. With everything reconnected, I reassembled the plastic shell, and powered it on.

Motherboard and connections

Motherboard and connections

Side view of the mounted monitor

Side view of the mounted monitor

Finished and mounted monitor

Finished and mounted monitor

Moment of truth

Moment of truth

It's ALIVE!

It’s ALIVE!

This game extended my post-repair testing by at least 30 minutes

This game extended my post-repair testing by at least 30 minutes

Another game

Another game

Everything worked fine, and after a quick recalibration, the machine looked and played almost as good as new. The total cost for the repair? About $5 in tape and picture wire, as well as a monitor worth around $15 on Kijiji. Not a bad fix, if you don’t mind the look.

Jackpot Crossing – The Anatomy of a Ticket Redemption Arcade Game

This game only needed some sensor repairs (a few transistors and capacitors were torn off on the coin detection boards), so I figured I’d use this post to go over the standard features of a typical ticket redemption game as well as the repair, just to keep things interesting.

This game, Jackpot Crossing by American Alpha, is a basic coin roller ticket redemption game. The objective is to roll tokens across the ramp through the tunnel at the end. If 7 tokens make it through, the player spells the word “JACKPOT” and wins the accumulated jackpot. Pretty basic stuff, and if a coin misses, it falls into a valley which awards 1-2 tickets depending on where the valley is on the board. It seems to have a twin called Mission Control, which is exactly the same besides the artwork and sound ROMs.

Although the cabinet seems somewhat cheaply made, most of the electronics inside are quality parts. The ticket dispenser is made in the US by Deltronic Labs (widely considered to be one of the best ticket dispenser manufacturers), and the power supply by Suzo-Happ (again, quality), however, the coin acceptor looks like a cheap off-brand Chinese model. Nonetheless, the machine was built in the early 2000s, and has held up this long, so I shouldn’t be complaining.

Front View

Front View

Rear View

Rear View

Powered On

Powered On

Play-field

Play-field

Play-field

Play-field

Roller Mechanism

Roller Mechanism

Inside View (Front)

Inside View (Front)

Inside View (Back)

Inside View (Back)

Power Supplies (x2) - The wiring isn't exactly the neatest in this.

Power Supplies (x2) – The wiring isn’t exactly the neatest in this.

Ticket Dispenser (Inside View)

Ticket Dispenser (Inside View)

Motherboard

Motherboard

Display Board

Display Board

Power Consumption

Power Consumption

Another Play-field View

Another Play-field View

So, now that you know what’s inside one of these, I’ll go over the repair. Simply put, someone wasn’t very careful when they were maintaining the machine. While removing the detection boards, they must have caught it on something, which tore off several parts. Luckily, I had spares of all the parts that were damaged, so replacing them wasn’t a problem.

One of the broken coin detection boards - I later found the torn-off capacitor in the coin bin.

One of the broken coin detection boards – I later found the torn-off capacitor in the coin bin.

Torn-Off Capacitor

Torn-Off Capacitor

Damaged Transistor Legs

Damaged Transistor Legs

When purchased, this game was listed as working, but later found to be broken when I tested it after getting it home; which should serve as a warning to you – Always go to the previews and test the games you’re interested in before bidding on them at an arcade auction. As a bonus, however, I did find half a stack of tickets and around 100 or so tokens lying around inside the cabinet amongst the dust and torn off parts. These’ll come in handy when testing games and parts in the future.

Tickets! More than I've ever won at Dave & Busters, actually...

Tickets! More than I’ve ever won at Dave & Busters, actually…

Tokens - Stamped for Cineplex

Tokens – Stamped for Cineplex

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – Finishing Touches

In this post, I’ll go over the last minor fixes that I made to get the Boxer looking good as new. First off, were the lightbulbs; both the halogens on the top and LED indicators on the inside. As for the indicators, replacing them was as simple as twisting out each old bulb and replacing it with a new one. The halogens, however, were missing the clip to hold them in place. I purchased new bulbs from a local lighting store, asked about the clip, and was given a full-sized one to try. After some bending with a pair of pliers, I was able to get it to fit the socket, and it worked like a charm to hold the bulbs in place.

The newly-installed bulbs

The newly-installed bulbs

The newly-installed halogens

The newly-installed halogens

Testing the bulbs

Testing the bulbs

Next was the coin mechanism door. It took around 10 minutes to rivet the whole thing in place, with 5mm short rivets purchased from Home Depot.

My riveting job

My riveting job

To finish it off, I removed the film from the front glass (it had never been removed when installed) and polished the whole machine with an automotive buffer pad and polish. Looks good as new now.

Front View

Front View

Side View

Side View

Other Side View

Other Side View

As you can see, I'm not very good at this...

As you can see, I’m not very good at this…

All in, I’ve probably spent around $300 total. I’ve included all of the resources that I’ve collected while completing this project below:

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – Installing The Electromagnet

As it turns out, the designers of this machine were crafty in choosing parts. After receiving the electromagnet in the mail, I did some research on it’s part number and manufacturer, only to find that it’s actually a starter solenoid for a number of Fiat-like vehicles built in the 80s, most notably, the Lada. From the Bulgarian manufacturer, Elprom Elhovo‘s, website, I discovered that the solenoid (model VES or ВЕС in Russian) was a compatible starter solenoid for the following vehicles:

  • LADA : 2101 – 2107, 2121
  • FIAT : 124, 125; 127 Berlina, Special – X 1/9; 128 Berlina, 3P, Familiare, Coupe, Special, Rally; 124 Berlina, Familiare, Special
  • AUTOBIANCHI : A 112, E, Arbath, A 111Primila
  • MURAT : 124 – 131
  • OYAK RENAULT : R12
  • ANADOL : SL, SV
  • SKODA : 1202 – 1203
  • OM : B10

That said, it can be found for around $30 from various Fiat and Lada part suppliers, or even cheaper if you live in the EU. I even found a listing for the exact same part on a Bulgarian version of Craigslist for around $16.

The solenoid I received

The solenoid I received

The $16 solenoid on Bulgarian Craigslist

The $16 solenoid on Bulgarian Craigslist. Note that the text on the packaging directly translates to what’s on the English version.

It’s somewhat annoying that I paid $120 for a $30 part, however, exorbitant prices seem to be the norm with parts purchased from amusement distributors.

That aside, installing the solenoid was a breeze. The black wire was connected to the matching connector on the top, and the grey wire was connected to the body of the solenoid. To fit the hammer on the solenoid, I had to cut the centre piece off the solenoid with a hacksaw, and use a lock nut and bolt to hold the hammer and solenoid together. The solenoid was then screwed into the boxer loosely, as it made a loud buzzing noise and would not close when tightly secured. See below for pictures from the installation process:

The solenoid connectors

The solenoid connectors

Where the solenoid screws in on the Boxer

Where the solenoid screws in on the Boxer

How the solenoid was wired

How the solenoid was wired

The newly-installed solenoid

The newly-installed solenoid. If you do hear a buzzing noise, then try loosening the solenoid a little.

Another view of the newly-installed solenoid. Notice how the hammer and solenoid are connected.

Another view of the newly-installed solenoid. Notice how the hammer and solenoid are connected.

I also received the punchball and pad, and installed them as shown below:

Punchball install

Punchball install

Retracted punchball

Retracted punchball

With these new parts installed, the boxer now works perfectly. In my next and final post on the boxer, I’ll go over the finishing touches and include links to some of the resources that I collected while completing this project.

What’s Missing:

  • 1 Top Halogen Light Bulb
  • Punchball
  • Solenoid/Electromagnet
  • Coin Acceptor
  • Some Screws + Nuts

What’s Needs Fixing:

  • Plastic Display Holder – It looks like someone took a sledgehammer to it…
  • Buttons – All of them are mismatched, and one’s sticky.
  • Foam Hand Guard
  • Many of the Mini Lightbulbs for the Strength Indicator are burned out
  • Display Board – Wires… Everywhere!
  • Cabinet needs some buffing/TLC
  • Coin/Mech door on the back needs a lock + screws

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – Installing The Coin Acceptor

The Coney Island Boxer is designed to work with an expensive Alberici mechanism, that uses somewhat proprietary signalling. In this post, I’ll go over how I got around that and was able to install an inexpensive generic multi-coin acceptor in it’s place. As I also received the new buttons in the mail, I’ll install those as well.

Chowhe Coin Mech

Chowhe CH-923 Coin Mechanism

The Chowhe CH-923 is an inexpensive ($25) programmable coin acceptor that can be used with up to 3 different coins at once. For those of you following my blog, you’ll notice that this is a similar acceptor to the one I used in my Arduino/MAME Coin Acceptor Project. Coins are differentiated with different pulse sequences on the coin signal line. For example, if you insert a quarter, the mechanism will output one pulse, but if you insert a loonie ($1 coin here in Canada), the mechanism will output four pulses. To program it, I followed the manual as before, to support quarters, loonies, and toonies. I’ve included a picture of the manual below for more detailed programming instructions:

CH-923 Manual

CH-923 Manual

Once programmed, I needed to remove the yellow solenoid on the side, so that it would fit in the coin mechanism cutout on the front of the boxer. As the acceptor was shorter than the cutout, I used a couple pieces of plastic sheeting on the top and bottom to cover the openings, and sealed them to the acceptor with a glue gun and screws.

Front View of the Coin Acceptor

Front view of the newly-installed coin acceptor

Once installed into the cutout, I reattached the solenoid on the inside, and connected the interface pins to the motherboard.

Inside view of the newly-installed acceptor

Inside view of the newly-installed acceptor

Motherboard Wiring Diagram

Motherboard Wiring Diagram

Boxer Interface Board

Boxer Interface Board

In order from left to right on the interface board, the wires were connected as follows:

  1. Red/+12v
  2. Black/GND
  3. White/Signal
  4. Gray/Enable Electromagnetic Counter

Once connected, I used the coin mechanism test option in the test menu to confirm that it was working correctly.

Next was the buttons. The old buttons were odd shapes and sizes, and didn’t exactly match; so I replaced them with three of the same red 43mm pushbuttons with built-in LEDs, which went for $1.50/ea on eBay. As the holes were bigger than the screw on the back, I had to improvise, using a few large caps to hold the buttons in place. I believe the blue one came from a Kernels popcorn seasoning shaker.

Inside view of the buttons

Inside view of the buttons

Front view of the buttons

Front view of the buttons

While replacing the Start button on the top, I discovered why the machine always released the ball on startup – the microswitch was connected on the NC (normally closed) line instead of the NO (normally open) line, which meant it closed the button circuit and started the game as soon as the machine was turned on.

Bird's eye view while changing the start button

Bird’s eye view while changing the start button

I finished off the day by ordering a punchball and pad off of eBay and the new solenoid from Coney Island Arcade for $120 plus shipping, as I couldn’t find one that would fit on my own.

What’s Missing:

  • 1 Top Halogen Light Bulb
  • Punchball
  • Solenoid/Electromagnet
  • Coin Acceptor
  • Some Screws + Nuts

What’s Needs Fixing:

  • Plastic Display Holder – It looks like someone took a sledgehammer to it…
  • Buttons – All of them are mismatched, and one’s sticky.
  • Foam Hand Guard
  • Many of the Mini Lightbulbs for the Strength Indicator are burned out
  • Display Board – Wires… Everywhere!
  • Cabinet needs some buffing/TLC
  • Coin/Mech door on the back needs a lock + screws

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – It Works!

I plugged in the boxer for the first time to test it today and received some good news. It works! I also cleaned out the inside, ran the tests, and did a few minor touchups to the display holder to make it usable. Here are some pictures:

The back of the machine.

The back of the machine.

I did some research, and from the stickers + labels on this unit, it seems to be designed by a company called Pigallegame, manufactured by a company called Pitt-BT (no website), parts supplied by a company called Novo-Parts (and they don’t even carry all of the parts), and licensed by Coney Island Arcade. It was made in Hungary in 2006. 3 of the 4 companies are based in Hungary and have poor english language support on their websites. I contacted each of the companies for support, and only Coney Island Arcade responded. I’ll be ordering the electromagnet/solenoid from them ($120 shipped to NY) if I can’t get one of my own to work. Coney Island’s website was down during the duration of this project.

The board diagram + testing options.

The board diagram + testing options.

Notice the broken english everywhere. Also, the wiring diagram for the coin selector is inaccurate and dangerous to follow, as it will destroy your coin acceptor. I’ll write a post later on about getting a generic (the machine is supposed to be used with an Alberici mechanism, which is really expensive) coin mechanism to work with the machine.

The display holder prior to installing the newly-fixed display.

The display holder prior to installing the newly-fixed display.

The display holder was a mess. Notice the broken plastic all over the place.

The CPU board. Notice the coin counter on the upper-right corner.

The CPU board. Notice the coin counter on the upper-right corner.

Here’s the CPU board. The coin counter says around 77000 coins have been inserted over the lifetime of the board. The little board above the CPU board is a power tap and the coin mechanism connection board.

Another shot of the CPU board.

Another shot of the CPU board.

The display board, installed.

The display board, installed.

I used the wing nuts that I had purchased the other day from Home Depot to install the display board. It fits nicely using only the screw holes on the cabinet itself, so I won’t have to replace the display holder which was quoted at $110 by Coney Island Arcade to replace.

The speaker and top of the inside of the machine.

The speaker and top of the inside of the machine.

The transformer + coin mech slot. The manual and a parts list was also included, in very broken english. I'll try and post pictures of both later on.

The transformer + coin mech slot.

Here you can see the transformer, coin mechanism slot, all the broken pieces of the display holder, the manual and a parts list. The manual was in very broken english. I’ll try and post pictures of both later on.

A shot of all the electronics boards.

A shot of all the electronics boards.

The newly-installed display holder from the front.

The newly-installed display from the front.

Moment of truth. Will it work? I sure hope so.

Moment of truth. Will it work? I sure hope so.

It works! I'm guessing this 6.27 is the software version currently loaded on the CPU board.

It works! I’m guessing this 6.27 is the software version currently loaded on the CPU board.

Woohoo!

Woohoo!

E. 1 Error.

E. 1 Error.

So, I turn the machine on, wait a few seconds, and this error pops up. What could it be? As it turns out, the machine tests out the solenoid at each startup, and uses the optical sensor to ensure that it’s working. If you manually release the arm during startup, the machine won’t detect a problem, and will work just fine.

I also ran all the tests available in the testing and options menus (activated by flipping the 2 DIP switches on the main CPU board to on). The light test showed me that all but 3 of the strength indicator lights were burned out, and the sound test showed me that the person who recorded the english phrases wasn’t a native english speaker – this makes for some hilarious insults if you score low on your punch. Difficulty can be adjusted along with the volume.

What’s Missing:

  • 1 Top Halogen Light Bulb
  • Punchball
  • Solenoid/Electromagnet
  • Coin Acceptor
  • Some Screws + Nuts

What’s Needs Fixing:

  • Plastic Display Holder – It looks like someone took a sledgehammer to it…
  • Buttons – All of them are mismatched, and one’s sticky.
  • Foam Hand Guard
  • Many of the Mini Lightbulbs for the Strength Indicator are burned out
  • Display Board – Wires… Everywhere!
  • Cabinet needs some buffing/TLC
  • Coin/Mech door on the back needs a lock + screws

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – Fixing the Display Board

I took a look at the display board today, and was pleasantly surprised – It’s fixable. The wires that were on it, are just to fix bad solder joints + breaks in the lines on the board.

Reverse of the board.

Reverse of the board.

Bad solder joints.

Bad solder joints.

Bad solder joints.

Bad solder joints.

Bad solder joints.

Bad solder joints.

Front of the display - Notice the super-effective makeshift display holder in the top right. There was plenty of the holding the display holder together on the inside of the cabinet.

Front of the display – Notice the super-effective makeshift display holder in the top right. There was plenty of that holding the display holder together on the inside of the cabinet.

To fix it, I desoldered all of the segments to record the paths that needed re-soldering, and put it back together with ripped-apart IDE cable to fix the broken joints on the board.

Display board with the bad digits removed.

Display board with the bad digits removed.

Uh oh. Looks like I'm going to need a little more wire than before.

Uh oh. Looks like I’m going to need a little more wire than before.

Reverse of the display board with the bad digits removed.

Reverse of the display board with the bad digits removed.

The front of the newly-fixed display board.

The front of the newly-fixed display board.

 

My wiring job. Hopefully this will work.

My wiring job. Hopefully this will work.

As of now, the rest of the machine’s working condition is unknown. I’ll test it out after installing this board in a day or so. I also purchased three replacement buttons (43mm seems to be the correct size from measurements I took) from eBay for around $2.50 each, 30 replacement LED indicator bulbs (for the strength indicator – the bulbs are standard T5 #74) for $1.50/10, and stopped by Home Depot to pick up a couple dozen assorted screws + nuts and a new locking bolt for the mech door. This brings our running cost to: $84.25.

What’s Missing:

  • 1 Top Halogen Light Bulb
  • Punchball
  • Solenoid/Electromagnet
  • Coin Acceptor
  • Some Screws + Nuts

What’s Needs Fixing:

  • Plastic Display Holder – It looks like someone took a sledgehammer to it…
  • Buttons – All of them are mismatched, and one’s sticky.
  • Foam Hand Guard
  • Many of the Mini Lightbulbs for the Strength Indicator are burned out
  • Display Board – Wires… Everywhere!
  • Cabinet needs some buffing/TLC
  • Coin/Mech door on the back needs a lock + screws

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – First Look

Here’s a few images of the exterior of the unit before I’ve done anything – It isn’t in that bad shape. The inside is a mess, with broken plastic, screws, nuts, and more everywhere – At least a copy of the manual + the parts list was included. The bad display board was also included, so I’ll try my hand at fixing it in a day or so and post the results.

2013-03-07 17.26.20

The display cover still has it’s protective film on, so it’s not in as bad shape as it appears.

2013-03-07 17.26.26

The white thing hanging down from the top is the foam hand guard. It’s missing the black cover, so I’ll have to either remove it, or blend it in somehow.

2013-03-07 17.26.53

This is just about the only thing on there that says Coney Island.

What’s Missing:

  • 1 Top Halogen Light Bulb
  • Punchball
  • Solenoid/Electromagnet
  • Coin Acceptor
  • Some Screws + Nuts

What’s Needs Fixing:

  • Plastic Display Holder – It looks like someone took a sledgehammer to it…
  • Buttons – All of them are mismatched, and one’s sticky.
  • Foam Hand Guard
  • Many of the Mini Lightbulbs for the Strength Indicator are burned out
  • Display Board – Wires… Everywhere!
  • Cabinet needs some buffing/TLC
  • Coin/Mech door on the back needs a lock + screws

Coney Island Boxer Restoration Project – The Beginning

I’ve just purchased my next project from a Playdium auction. It’s a Coney Island Arcade branded boxer machine (sometimes also known as a punchball machine, strength tester, or punch measurer) that, from the auction listing, appears to be in terrible disrepair. Since there is very little repair information on boxer machines available on the internet, I’ll be posting updates on what I’ve done (with pictures + instructions), and a total running cost, as I fix it; piece by piece.

The description of the boxer from the auction was: “Coney Island Boxer – This is being sold for PARTS ONLY! Missing coil, missing bag, bad display, missing mech.” Ouch.

Images from the auction:

Well, the body doesn't look that bad...

The body is in OK condition.

Guess I'll be replacing that.

Guess I’ll be replacing that.

You know it's a risky buy when the list of problems is longer than the space available on the problem sheet.

You know it’s a risky buy when the list of problems is longer than the space available on the problem listing sheet.

So far:

Unit Cost: $37.29

Trailer Rental: $30.00

Total Running Cost: $67.29

Fixing a Blurry Arcade Cabinet Monitor (CRT)

I recently acquired a Simpsons Bowling arcade cabinet that had a blurry, unfocussed display. Here’s how I fixed it (for free) to be good as new.

The Cabinet:

Front view - Overall, it wasn't in that bad shape.

Front view – Overall, it wasn’t in that bad shape.

Side-view of the cabinet.

Side-view of the cabinet.

I learned later on that this cabinet had been left outside, unprotected for several weeks before I picked it up. That would explain the water damage!

I learned later on that this cabinet had been left outside, unprotected for several weeks before I picked it up. That would explain the water damage!

Before:

IMG-20121004-01162

Gameplay

IMG-20121005-01175

Close-up of Blurriness

IMG-20121005-01174

Another Close-up

After:

DSC02499

That’s better!

DSC02500

It helps when you can actually SEE the bowling ball.

DSC02497

Made it to the Top 10 on my first try after fixing it. Coincidence? I think not!


The Fix (Step-by-Step):

Sorry about the awful picture.

Sorry about the awful picture.

  1. Find a friend.
  2. Power up the game.
  3. Open up the cabinet.
  4. Find the knob labelled “focus”. It should be on the flyback transformer, on the display board somewhere near the end of the picture tube. I’ve circled/boxed the flyback on my cabinet in the image above. ***DANGER – BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN WORKING NEAR THE PICTURE TUBE, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT’S POWERED ON! DO NOT TOUCH THE DISPLAY BOARD OR THE CAPACITORS! THE CAPACITORS ON THE DISPLAY BOARD ARE CHARGED WITH EXTREMELY HIGH VOLTAGES THAT CAN KILL YOU, EVEN WHEN THE MONITOR IS POWERED OFF. IF YOU ARE NOT COMFORTABLE WORKING WITH HIGH VOLTAGES, EITHER FIND SOMEONE WHO IS OR DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS FIX.***
  5. Have your friend watch the screen and tell you when the screen becomes focussed as you slowly twist the focus knob. The screen should become either clearer or more blurry. If it becomes more blurry, try twisting the knob the other way. If that doesn’t work, you’ll probably need to replace the caps on the display board.